Winter Air Quality Tips

car tire in snow and ice

Wintry weather brings driving challenges, among them snow and ice. Make sure your tires are winter ready by checking your tire pressure and tread.  Cold temperatures can reduce tire pressure to below recommended levels. Losing pressure reduces your gas mileage and can result in worn tires.

Idling is not the best way to warm up your car, and you should never idle a car inside an enclosed garage. Driving your vehicle is the best way to warm it up, so once your windshield and windows are clear, you’re good to go. If you need to wait a few minutes to pick up a friend, turn off your engine. Keep a blanket in the car for emergencies or to stay toasty warm while you are waiting and being idle free.

Air Friendly Holidays Ahead

The holidays are an easy time to stay air-friendly, even during the hustle and bustle of shopping, welcoming friends and family and traveling to gatherings.  If you’re shopping until you’re dropping, enlist the help of a friend to share the ride, carry packages and cross items off your list together.  If you’re hosting a  holiday party, check thrift shops for reusable serving dishes and glassware to give your table some eco-friendly sparkle. If your vehicle needs maintenance, get it checked before you hit the road. Ice scrapers make good stocking stuffers, and reduce the time spent idling when your windshield needs clearing.

Stay Informed About Air Quality Year-Round

We are out of ozone season here in Kentuckiana, but we will still keep you informed about local air quality. Forecasts continue for particle pollution throughout the winter months. KAIRE will also keep you informed about issues involving local air quality and sustainability.  As always, we will promote air friendly programs like Idle Free, which encourages us all to help keep the air in our communities cleaner, no matter what the season.

Idling = wasted gas = wasted $$$

 

 

 

 

 

 

6 billion gallons. That’s a lot of gallons, people.

From the smart folks at the Cape Cod Times:

Let’s start with boring but telling numbers from the U.S. Department of Energy, which estimates that we waste 6 billion gallons of fuel a year by idling our cars and trucks. About half of that is from personal vehicles, which consume, on average, 12 gallons of fuel per vehicle per year from idling – enough to fill most gas tanks. Nationwide, idling costs $8 billion a year, and spews an extra 30 million tons of carbon dioxide into the air we breathe.